Teddy Talk

Michelle Obama is criticizing Sheryl Sandburg’s TED talks which advised women to “lean in” at work to get ahead. The former First Lady does not believe it’s appropriate to put the burden on individual women rather than change corporate policies. I’m somewhat in the Sandburg camp. Performance is key. Yet. Can’t have it all at the same time. Agree.

In that regard, Bloomberg study proves my fear that a #MeToo backlash would be swift and severe. Men are now afraid to be alone with women in and out of the workplace. That will mean more segregation and less opportunities for women to be where business is often conducted. And. Now more than ever important to keep teddies hidden and only wear professional attire.

Speaking of Teddy Ruxpin redux. That old animatronic talking bear is making a resurgence this Christmas. Its ignominious financial collapse was the stuffing of the 1987 market crash.

Never forget that deal or that day.

Melania Woke

The silent FLOTUS seems to have found her voice. After apparently having taken a laissez-faire approach with Kelly and the West Wing, she’s suddenly speaking out. Calling for the firing of a woman in the NSC. Melania’s requests for promotions for her own staff went ignored for months. So. Something must have happened to set her off with Mira Ricardel. Or. Maybe Melania just finished watching Claire on House of Cards. She and Robin Wright can both rock a Chanel suit.

House of Stereotypes

The final season of House of Cards is a pathetic celebration of stereotypes. With a little ridiculousness added. Claire Hale Underwood. The first woman President schemes to become Vice President before she inherits the job from a complicit murder of Frank Underwood, her President husband. Then she spars with her bff mean-girl rival born of old prep school jealousies. Random. Lame. Finally. She becomes hormonally psychotic in the Oval Office. Even Hillary seems sane compared to this. Sorry feminists. Claire makes you all look so bad! Sad.

Robin Wright v. Diane Lane. The latter better in The Romanoffs.

Suburban Women Rule?

Suburban women are expected to swing the mid-terms to the Democrats. Monica Hesse’s excellent opinion piece in WaPo says, “I will go out on a limb to say it is great that suburban women do not like racist, sexist speech. I will tiptoe out further to say it’s weird that racist, sexist speech would not also bother male voters… Shouldn’t fathers want independent daughters, and husbands want wives who are equal partners?” She also confirms my mantra about Trump’s equal opportunity insults, but only suburban women are offended.

The media never seem to realize that when they extol the virtues of “college-educated women”, defining them as such insults most everyone else in the country.

Man & Milkman

The Man Booker Prize winner this year is Anna Burns from Northern Ireland for Milkman. It is her third novel. The prize was for authors in the Commonwealth countries of the United Kingdom until recent years when it included Americans. There was also a separate Orange Prize which has been since sponsored by others for only women authors. However, in the past two decades, women have been well represented and even dominated the Booker short list in 2018.

Hilary Mantel won the Man Booker twice. Other women winners include Margaret Atwood. A.S. Byatt. My favorite Luminaries Eleanor Catton. Anne Enright. And this year Anna Burns.

So why a separate prize for women? Good writing is. Good writing.

Stepford Think

The Stepford Wives. A fictitious clan of suburban women who were somehow transformed into robotic subservient mates. Kind of a modern Handmaid’s Tale. Programmed to obey their masters. Men. Who made them do things in lock-step as a group. Sound familiar? It’s what Democrat feminists expect. Obsequious sycophants who vote and march as their proprietary parade.

Susan Chira’s analysis pointed out the irony and hypocrisy of this political movement in her NYTimes article, Women Don’t Think Alike. Why Do We Think They Do?

An excellent question.

Two Stateswomen

Senators Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski. From Maine and Alaska. Close colleagues who took very different votes on Brett Kavanaugh. Both made deliberate, diligent, thoughtful, non-partisan decisions. Collins supported his nomination in a factual studied listing of his centrist opinions on the bench. She cited the presumption of innocence as a critical component of American values. Murkowski agreed with much of Collins’ reasoning, yet felt that in the end Kavanaugh has the wrong demeanor to be a Supreme Court Justice for this time.

Both Republicans. Different conclusions. Both stateswomen.