Green Day

I know. Musical allusions abound. Anyway. That was fast. Virginia out. Busted brackets making more racket than St. Patrick’s Day parade marching bands up Fifth Avenue. Tiger sure didn’t burn up the greens either yesterday. So. Guess it’s dyed beer at the pubs to drown sorrows and boredom. Or read a book. Autumn by Ali Smith next on the book club list. Even though it’s nearly Spring, it’s cold. Yeah. One of those days.

Do the Lighten Up

Make America laugh again. Journalists are such easy prey. They take themselves so seriously that any jab puts them into supercillious overdrive. Get a grip. Stop swinging at low hanging fruit and do some real reporting. Stormy. Really? And. Of course. Dennis Rodman would love to join the Rocket Man summit. Why not?

Speaking of light. Two out of three books so far fit the bill. The Wife Between Us, by Greer Hendricks, Sarah Pekkanen. Not sure why this took two women to conjure it. Disturbed families. Vulnerable adults. Worth a few hours on a wintry Saturday. Mrs., Caitlin Macy. Upper East Side moms. Nothing more than trite. However, The Woman In the Window, by A.J. Finn is not light at all. Dr.Husband reports depressing and tedious. So nope. Won’t read that one.

Apologies to Archie Bell & the Drells. Go Tiger!

Weekend Stacks

New books for Carol’s carrel. Late winter weekend Storm Riley reading. Lighter fare as we await Spring. Here is my new stack. Hmmm. Looks a little chick-litty. We’ll see. Read any?

The Immortalists, Chloe Benjamin
The French Girl, Lexie Elliott
Mrs., Caitlin Macy
The Wife Between Us, Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen
Autumn, Ali Smith
The Woman in the Window, A.J. Finn


Will North & South Korea benefit from cultural connections at the Olympics? If so, it may be the best outcome of a lackluster Games. Meanwhile back at Homeland, ripped from the headlines. Will Alex Jones mount a standoff? Guns. Militias. Tipping toward civil unrest.

Franco out. Tiger in.

Read Lisa Halliday’s first novel, Asymmetry. The first section a novella memoir of her romantic liaison with a forty-years older Philip Roth-esque author mentor. That section was good. The second and third sections failed as did the structure. Not so much.

Book Treks reviews.

Writing Wrongs

Just finished the novel Golden Hill by Francis Spufford. Manhattan 1746. Richard Smith, a young handsome man, appears at a counting house after a long voyage from London. He has a note for an extremely large sum to be paid to him in sixty days. Everyone is wary because his plans for the money are secret. Smith finds New-York gritty and dark where a sense of morality seems out of place. During the days he awaits payment, Smith has many misadventures as a result of bad luck and bad choices. Especially his love for a combative clever girl. But in the end. He rights some wrongs. Historical redemption. A beautifully written read.

Speaking of horrific wrongs. Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida is named for a journalist who turned activist protecting the Everglades. As with the shooting in her eponymous school, journalists converged to report the story. Yet they lost objectivity and immediately became anti-gun activists, even going so far as to exploit students in shock. It’s okay to have opinions. Editorialize. Show sadness in the face of tragedy. But do it after the story has been reported. And tell your audience that it’s an opinion piece. Not news.

Sober Reflections

Thankfully didn’t sip each time Trump uttered the litany of targeted SOTU words. Would have been ugly. Melania wore white. As a nod to suffragettes? Serious stretch. Dems responses too disparate to follow. Bernie’s online feed failed. Joe Kennedy’s spittle a distraction. Maxine Waters on BET? Did anybody see that? Cohesive messaging please.

Finished a relevant novel. Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie. Man Booker longlisted story which reflects past observations about the Lost Boys who join gangs to feel valued and find direction. From Northampton, Massachusetts to Raqqa. An important read.

Serpentine Shifts

The Golden GlobesHats off to the few women who represented true individualism by not conforming to walking the red carpet in black. What’s the point when you pose and strut and remain objectified as a pretty thing anyway? Nicole should have thanked her co-star. Male directors need not have been dissed. Misandry is not the answer to bad behavior by a few jerks. Happy about James Franco. Of course. And Seth Meyers was solid.

The Essex Serpent, a novel by Sarah Perry. An amorphous Ness. Meant to be a Victorian Gothic homage, it didn’t quite manage either. Science, medicine, modernity dispelled the gossamer blue fog along a rural estuary where the mythic serpent was reportedly glimpsed. The so-called monster never conjured a terror commensurate with the village’s reaction. Perry draws her characters well. They just didn’t seem to belong in the same story together. A good read, but don’t agree with all the literary accolades.